Emergency Management

Emergency management is the organization and management of resources and responsibilities for dealing with all aspects of emergencies, particularly preparedness, response and rehabilitation. Emergency Management is a division of the Burleson Police Department.

Texas Code
According to Section 418.1015 (a) of the Texas Government Code, the mayor is the director of emergency management. The mayor serves as the governor's designated agent in the administration and supervision of duties defined in Chapter 418 of the Government Code; may exercise the powers granted to the governor under Chapter 418 on an appropriate local scale; and, has the authority to declare a local state of disaster. As provided by Section 418.1015 (c), the mayor has designated the fire chief to serve as emergency management coordinator to assist the mayor by developing the emergency management plan for the City and implementing that plan in response to a potential or actual emergency.

Included in Emergency Management
Emergency management involves plans, structures and arrangements established to engage the normal operations of government, voluntary and private agencies in a comprehensive and coordinated way to respond to the whole spectrum of emergency needs. This is also known as disaster management.

Emergency Operations Center
The City’s Emergency Operations Center is the information hub. The EOC team - fire department, police department, public works, and public information officer - man the EOC when severe weather is imminent. The EOC team works with the National Weather Service, City personnel trained in Skywarn, and Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Services (RACES) storm spotters. The outdoor warning siren system and the Everbridge Emergency Alerts are sent from the EOC. Other City departments are kept on alert to provide needed services if disaster does strike.

Weather Policy
The City of Burleson policy follows the North Central Texas Council of Government weather policy which defines severe weather as a storm with the potential of producing hail at least one-inch in diameter and/or winds in excess of 70 miles per hour. Tornadoes, which can occur year round at any time of day, can produce winds that range from 110 to more than 250 miles per hour. City officials encourage all citizens to buy a weather radio with S.A.M.E. technology (programming to receive local alerts).

Be Prepared
Know the risk, have a plan, and practice it before severe weather strikes. A 20-page Preparedness Guide (PDF) is available through the National Weather Service.

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